EMAIL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM? GET IT BEFORE IT GETS YOU

If your company uses emails to communicate with clients, then it’s not enough to just rely on traditional ways of managing email, such as backing up emails periodically. There needs to be a well-equipped email management system in place that will keep your business safe.

The key point that relates to the heavy use of email, is the maintenance of the integrity of the email, and being able to prove that integrity. Unfortunately, you can’t simply do nothing and leave your email system as is and hope for the best. Firstly, it is important to understand the legal requirements. This includes the Electronic Communications and Transaction Act, 2002, or the ECT Act.

The ECT Act provides that information is not without legal force and effect simply because it is in electronic form. These are some of the rules set out by the ECT Act regarding electronic communications.

  1. An electronic document must be captured, retained and retrievable.
  2. Electronic documents must be accessible so as to be useable for subsequent reference, this includes the origin, destination, date and time it was sent or received.
  3. If a signature is required, it must be accompanied by an authentication service.

So what should you do?

All companies who wish to comply with the regulations should implement an effective email management system. The core requirements of a good email management system are as follows:

  1. The ability to monitor and intercept email;
  2. Effective capturing of all email;
  3. Cost effective storage of all email and efficient discarding of email that has lost its business value or is no longer required for legal or regulatory or compliance;
  4. Efficient and cost effective restoration of email;
  5. The ability to maintain the integrity of email and the contents thereof; and
  6. The ability to audit email use in order to be able to prove integrity.

Although it seems like a trivial matter, it is worthwhile to implement an email management system in your company. It will help protect your business in the event that you need a record of communication due to an incident or contract dispute. New regulations introduced by POPI will also make this a necessary part of how your company handles information.

Reference:

  • The Electronic Communications and Transaction Act, 2002

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

THE COMPULSORY ROTATION OF AUDITORS

Every public and state-owned company has to appoint an auditor and a company secretary.  However, in terms of section 92 of the Companies Act, 2008, the same individual is not allowed to serve as the auditor or designated auditor of a company for more than 5 consecutive financial years.

What does this mean for my company?

  • If an individual has served as the auditor or designated auditor of your company for 2 or more consecutive financial years, and then ceases the position, the individual may not be appointed again as the auditor or designated auditor of the company until after the expiry of at least two further financial years.
  • If your company has appointed 2 or more persons as joint auditors, you must manage the required rotation in a way that all of the joint auditors do not relinquish office in the same year.

Despite the strict requirements for public and state-owned companies, it is not compulsory for private or personal liability companies to appoint an auditor, unless the company is required to produce audited financial statements.

Is this for the better?

It is understood that the external audit function is an activity of public protection and provides credibility to financial statements and assurance to investors. However, auditor rotation could lead to additional costs to companies, as the new auditor would be required to perform additional procedures on the opening balances of their new client.

In some areas, it could also impact negatively on the availability of auditors, as some towns only have a limited number of registered auditors. Auditors practicing as sole practitioners will also be affected, and could lose long-term clients unless they bring in another registered auditor and expand their practice.

References:

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

EMAIL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM? GET IT BEFORE IT GETS YOU

If your company uses emails to communicate with clients, then it’s not enough to just rely on traditional ways of managing email, such as backing up emails periodically. There needs to be a well-equipped email management system in place that will keep your business safe.

The key point that relates to the heavy use of email, is the maintenance of the integrity of the email, and being able to prove that integrity. Unfortunately, you can’t simply do nothing and leave your email system as is and hope for the best. Firstly, it is important to understand the legal requirements. This includes the Electronic Communications and Transaction Act, 2002, or the ECT Act.

The ECT Act provides that information is not without legal force and effect simply because it is in electronic form. These are some of the rules set out by the ECT Act regarding electronic communications.

  1. An electronic document must be captured, retained and retrievable.
  2. Electronic documents must be accessible so as to be useable for subsequent reference, this includes the origin, destination, date and time it was sent or received.
  3. If a signature is required, it must be accompanied by an authentication service.

So what should you do?

All companies who wish to comply with the regulations should implement an effective email management system. The core requirements of a good email management system are as follows:

  1. The ability to monitor and intercept email;
  2. Effective capturing of all email;
  3. Cost effective storage of all email and efficient discarding of email that has lost its business value or is no longer required for legal or regulatory or compliance;
  4. Efficient and cost effective restoration of email;
  5. The ability to maintain the integrity of email and the contents thereof; and
  6. The ability to audit email use in order to be able to prove integrity.

Although it seems like a trivial matter, it is worthwhile to implement an email management system in your company. It will help protect your business in the event that you need a record of communication due to an incident or contract dispute. New regulations introduced by POPI will also make this a necessary part of how your company handles information.

Reference:

  • The Electronic Communications and Transaction Act, 2002

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

REQUIREMENTS TO RESTORE A DEREGISTERED COMPANY

There are various circumstances in which a company (or close corporation) can become deregistered at the CIPC.

  1. The company itself can apply for deregistration at the CIPC, for any number of reasons.
  2. If a company has not submitted and paid its annual returns for more than two successive years, the CIPC will inform such a company of the fact and the intention of the CIPC to deregister said company. If such a company does not take any steps to remedy the situation, the CIPC will proceed to finally deregister it.
  3. If the CIPC believes that the company has been inactive for seven or more years.

However, it is possible to restore such a company or close corporation which has been finally deregistered, but all outstanding information and annual returns (including the fees) will have to be lodged with the CIPC. An additional R200 prescribed re-instatement fee must also be paid.

Recently, the CIPC has set additional requirements to do this, which also impacts on the time, administration and cost to restore such a company. These requirements took effect from 1 November 2012.

The steps and requirements for the re-instatement process are:

  1. The proper application CoR40.5 form Application for Re-instatement of Deregistered Company must be completed and submitted, originally signed by the duly authorised person.
  2. A certified copy of the identity document of the applicant (director / member) must be submitted.
  3. A certified copy of the identity document of the person filing the application must be submitted.
  4. A Deed Search, reflecting the ownership of any immovable property (or not) by the company, must be obtained and submitted together with the application.
  5. If the company does in fact own any immovable property, a letter from National Treasury must be submitted, indicating that the department has no objection to the re-instatement of the company.
  6. Also, if the company does in fact own any immovable property, a letter from the Department of Public Works must be submitted, indicating that the department has no objection to the re-instatement of the company.
  7. An advertisement must be placed in a local newspaper where the business of the company is conducted, giving 21 days’ notice of the proposed application for re-instatement.
  8. If the deregistration was due to non-compliance with regards to annual returns, an affidavit indicating the reasons for the non-filing of annual returns must be submitted.
  9. If the company itself applied for deregistration, an affidavit indicating the reasons for the original request for deregistration must be submitted.
  10. Sufficient documentary proof indicating that the company was in business or that it had any assets or liabilities at the time of deregistration must be submitted.
  11. All outstanding annual returns must be submitted and paid, along with any penalties.

Upon compliance of all of the above requirements, the CIPC will issue a notice to the company that it is restored.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted. (E&OE)